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  • 02 Apr 2014
          Carl Zeiss Sports Optics Adds New Sunshade for Riflescopes             NORTH CHESTERFIELD, VA., (March 31 , 2014) - Carl Zeiss Sports Optics, the world's leading manufacturer of high performance sports optics is pleased to announce the new sunshade accessory designed specifically for 42mm and 50mm CONQUEST HD5 and TERRA 3x riflescopes.  These uniquely designed sunshades will help prevent stray light from entering your scope and producing flare and glare across your sight picture. Prevent a sudden flash of sunlight from ruining your hunting experience with these new ZEISS sunshades.  Just attach the shade to the end of your scope, and enjoy the clarity it brings on super sunny days.  These shades can also drastically reduce glare so sunlight can't give away your position to game animals.  ZEISS sunshades are also designed to keep dust and rain off the objective lens. Another benefit of the sunshade is that it reduces the effects of mirage caused by heat coming off the barrel when firing repeatedly. Installation of the ZEISS sunshade is simple.  It can be easily screwed into place on the objective end of the scope.   Product features: Reduces glare from sunlight Anodized to match scopes’ matte finish Length excluding the threading is 3.75 inches Improves Image Quality Blocks Peripheral Light Shields Dust/Dirt/Debris/Moisture   MSRP’s:   CONQUEST HD5 / TERRA 3x 42mm     $53.42   CONQUEST HD5  / TERRA 3x 50mm    $55.54      About Carl Zeiss Sports Optics   Carl Zeiss Sports Optics is a leading, international provider of premium sports optics and is part of the Consumer Optics Group of Carl Zeiss. Carl Zeiss Sports Optics, LLC is responsible for sales, marketing and distribution of its state-of-the-art binoculars, riflescopes, rangefinders and spotting scopes throughout the United States and Canada. Carl Zeiss Sports Optics’ North American headquarters is located in North Chesterfield, VA.   About the ZEISS Group ZEISS is an internationally leading technology enterprise operating in the fields of optics and optoelectronics. The company has been contributing to technological progress for more than 160 years. Founded in 1846, the company now has its headquarters in Oberkochen in southwest Germany and has representatives in over 40 countries.
    47741 Posted by Chris Avena
  • 01 Jun 2014
                                         The Winds of Change By Chris Avena   Our forefathers had the vision to see far into the future to our present day America. They bestowed upon us the basic rights and freedoms as a strong foundation that our great country was built on. In present day America, it seems that our Constitutional Rights that were handed down to us over two hundred years ago are under threat of change.   In today’s America, it is politically incorrect to speak your mind in fear of offending someone. It has become a place were “Big Government” is slowly taking away our rights and freedoms that thousands of Americans fought and died to protect. The word Patriot is defined as one who loves, supports and defends his or her country and its interests with devotion. We had the pleasure of speaking to Ted Nugent. Agree or disagree with his words or beliefs, but like it or not – Ted is here to fight for your rights because he is “A Patriot”.   SeeMeHunt - Do you feel that it is detrimental that the American Media allows commentators who are non- U.S Citizens to voice a strong opinion against our Constitutional Rights – thus, Influencing the American public to believe that our Constitutional Rights are in dire need of ratification?   Ted Nugent -Ya think! With the American and global media hellbent on an America hating, freedom hating, gun hating rampage, such consistency of hate for our sacred Constitution and overall American dream of individualism and individual rights and freedoms is brainwashing an ever increasing gaggle of ignorant and weak people to fall for the Saul Alinsky/Barak Obama scam of big government socialism. That is why that same media and government goons attack me and hate me. I wear it as a badge of honor standing up for we the people principles. It is that simple.   SeeMeHunt -The Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp (FDIC) had listed firearm and ammunition sellers as “High Risk”. Since then, the Obama Administration has applied pressure to banking and lending institutions such as Bank of America, GE Capital and TD Bank to cut ties to gun stores and freeze assets to firearm related business. How detrimental can it be when the government can dictate to our financial institutions who they can do business with?   Ted Nugent- Tyrants, dictators, emperors, despots and gangbangers have always tripped over themselves throughout history to disarm free citizens and in every instance, it has turned out catastrophic for every society. The history of the world is rife with irrefutable evidence that the Obama government is maniacal in their "fundamental transformation" of the greatest quality of life in the history of mankind, and we the people damn well better wake up and fulfill our we the people responsibilities to pressure and direct our government employees what we expect of them. Anyone who seeks to force free people into unarmed helplessness is evil personified. Case closed.   SeeMeHunt -The New York Safe Act is the most aggressive and controversial piece of legislation on gun control to date. What is it that makes the Safe Act more about Gun Confiscation than Gun Control?   Ted Nugent - Only evil, rotten, dangerous people would claim that "shall not be infringed" means something other than the unambiguous statement it is. All laws infringing on law abiding Americans are criminal as are the creators and enforcers of such criminal laws. S   SeeMeHunt -Chicago’s Mayor Rahm Emanuel has lobbied hard to outlaw gun stores in the city of Chicago. As of now you will not find a gun stores in 99.5 percent of the city. The few stores that still remain will require a video record of all gun sales. How is this not a direct violation of our Constitutional Rights?    Ted Nugent- Rahm Emanuel is a direct violation of the US Constitution and all things holy in America. If there were truly justice in America, Rahm Emanuel, the president and his gun running attorney general Eric Holder along with Hillary Clinton and the whole America hating gang would all be arrested, tried, convicted and jailed for their clear and present danger to America. Period.   We are at a critical tipping point in our countries history. Our rights and freedmons are under attack. It is our obligation to question our elected officials and fight for what is rightfully ours before it is too late.
    32318 Posted by Chris Avena
  • 20 Jan 2014
        To: ALL MEDIAFor immediate release January 15, 2014 For more information contact: Bill Brassard Jr.203-426-1320 New York Benefits from Spending by Target Shooters   Read the Report View/Download as PDF   View INFOGRAPHIC LAS VEGAS, Nev. -- The National Shooting Sports Foundation has released a major new report about the importance of target shooting activities to the economies of New York and the nation. NSSF is the trade association for the firearms, ammunition, hunting and shooting sports industry. The report, Target Shooting in America: Millions of Shooters, Billions of Dollars, was released today in conjunction with a press conference at the Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade Show (SHOT Show), the largest trade show of its kind in the world and a showcase for the firearms and ammunition industry. The report provides a first-ever look at U.S. target shooting-related expenditures. Also included are state-by-state statistics for the number of target shooters, retail sales, taxes and jobs. The target-shooting report complements the Hunting in America report released by NSSF and the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies in March 2013. In New York, target shooting-related spending contributed $817,050,105 to the state's economy and supported 6,333 jobs. Nationally, the money target shooters spent in 2011 resulted in $23 billion being added to the nation's economy and supported more than 185,000 jobs. "More people target shooting is good news for the industry, and it is equally good news for America’s economy," said NSSF President and CEO Steve Sanetti. Retail sales related to target shooting account for nearly $10 billion, with rifle and handgun shooting being the leading contributors, followed by shotgun and muzzleloader shooting. California and Texas are the top two states ranked by retail sales. Combining data from Target Shooting in America and Hunting in America shows that target shooters and hunters together poured more than $110 billion into the nation’s economy, fueling more than 866,000 jobs. “Communities and businesses of all sizes benefit from these activities,” said Sanetti. Target shooters ($8.2 billion) and hunters ($8.4 billion) spend nearly equal amounts on equipment common to both pursuits, such as firearms, ammunition and accessories. Hunters spend more overall than target shooters when factors such as fuel, food, lodging and transportation are included. “The Target Shooting in America and Hunting in America reports give us a more complete understanding of the economic importance of the shooting sports to America,” said Sanetti. “We’ve long known about the recreational benefits of these activities, and now we know how much they contribute to our country’s financial well-being.” Read Target Shooting in America: Millions of Shooters, Billions of Dollars or view the report as a printable PDF. -30- About NSSFThe National Shooting Sports Foundation is the trade association for the firearms industry. Its mission is to promote, protect and preserve hunting and the shooting sports. Formed in 1961, NSSF has a membership of more than 10,000 manufacturers, distributors, firearms retailers, shooting ranges, sportsmen's organizations and publishers. For more information, log on to www.nssf.org.  
    24256 Posted by Chris Avena
  • 10 Dec 2010
    86-year-old Pa. man hunts from recliner, bags buck By MICHAEL RUBINKAM Associated Press Posted: 12/07/2010 04:49:01 PM EST   ALLENTOWN, Pa.—Lester Warner left the hospital in a weakened state last month, his frail body wracked by late-stage cancer. At 86 years old, he and his family had decided to stop treatment. But that didn't mean he planned to stop hunting. Pennsylvania's highly anticipated two-week rifle deer season was fast approaching, and the lifelong hunter from Dover Township, about 30 miles south of Harrisburg, wanted to take to the woods one last time. "He just assumed he would be going. We decided we were going to play along with it: 'Yeah, we can't wait for hunting season, Dad,'" recalled Warner's son, Brian. Brian and his brother Scott were skeptical. But when their father started to rally—gaining strength with the help of a physical therapist—they decided they had better accommodate him, said Brian, 51. So Brian lugged an old recliner up the side of Broadtop Mountain, near his Huntingdon County dairy farm, to the small hut the family had built for Les Warner years ago. His father would hunt in comfort. It was 19 degrees as the sun rose on opening day last week, the valley floor white with frost. Warner eased his old man's frame into the recliner, sipped his coffee, and waited, armed with the .243 Winchester that Brian had selected for its mild recoil. It wasn't long before a huge 8-point buck emerged from the woods, the biggest that Warner or his son had ever had the opportunity to take. They marveled at their good fortune. A hunter can go days without seeing a buck. "Well, shoot it," Warner told Brian. "No, you're gonna shoot it," his son replied. Warner stood up from the recliner and took aim. The buck bolted. He followed it for 80 or 90 yards. Then, as it slowed down, he pulled the trigger. A perfect shot. Lowering the gun, Warner turned to his son and said: "Never give up." "That's right, Dad." Brian called his mother. Shirley Warner could scarcely believe it. "Knowing what he's been through in the last six months, in and out of the hospital, radiation and chemo and physical therapy and really sick at times, I was shocked. In my wildest dreams I didn't think he would get a buck this year," said Shirley, who's been married to Les for 53 years. "My son and I cried because it was a miracle ... there's no other explanation." A week later, the retired pretzel baker remains thankful. "I know I've had many blessings through this situation," said Les Warner, whose story was first reported by the York Daily Record. "Everything seems to be turning out well for me, and I know the Lord's been with us."
    23806 Posted by Chris Avena
Rifles 1,060 views Oct 29, 2010
Remington 700 - Is it Safe?

Critical safety questions at Remington Arms

Two dozen deaths, more than 100 injuries linked to Model 700 rifle

By Scott Cohn Correspondent

CNBC CNBC
updated 10/20/2010 6:31:19 PM ET 2010-10-20T22:31:19

A 10-month investigation by CNBC has found that at least two dozen deaths and more than 100 injuries have been linked to the signature product of an iconic American company.

The Remington Model 700-series rifle - with more than 5 million sold - is one of the world’s most popular firearms. Famous for its accuracy, the rifle is now the target of a series of lawsuits claiming that it is unsafe and susceptible to firing without pulling the trigger.

Remington insists its rifle is safe and free of any defect, though internal documents obtained by CNBC indicate the company has wrestled with concerns over the gun’s safety for some 60 years. The documents reveal that on at least two occasions, the company considered – and then decided against – a modification of the original trigger design intended to eliminate inadvertent discharges. One of those proposed fixes would have cost Remington 5.5 cents per gun, according to the company’s own calculations.

To date, more than 75 lawsuits have been filed against Remington alleging safety problems with its 700-series rifle. The company has consistently stated that the deaths and injuries involving the gun have been the result of improper modifications, poor maintenance or unsafe handling, and it has prevailed in some court cases by arguing that inexperienced users are in denial that they pulled the trigger.

CNBC: Remington Under Fire

One of those who have suffered devastating consequences as the result of the Remington 700-series rifle is Richard Barber, of Manhattan, Mont. In 2000, Barber said, his 9-year-old son Gus was fatally shot after a day of hunting with his family when a Remington 700 rifle inadvertently discharged. Gus’ mother, Barbara Barber, had been unloading her rifle and later said she was certain her finger was not on the trigger when the gun suddenly fired. Within days of the accident, Barber began hearing about other incidents in which Remington 700s inadvertently went off.

“I went to the funeral home and looked Gus right square in the eye and I said, ‘Son, it ends here and now.'" Barber said. "I promised him I would never be bought off and I would never quit until I've effected change."

The Barber family sued Remington, and as a result the company agreed in 2002 to modify certain older 700 rifles for a fee of $20. But the settlement stopped short of a full recall, and the basic design of the rifle stayed the same.

CNBC found that from the very beginning, the company looked at ways to fix its bolt-action rifle, even contemplating a nationwide recall. But on more than one occasion, Remington decided against a recall.

And it turns out that decision is Remington's, and Remington's alone.

For most products – cars, toys, food, even BB guns - the government can order a recall. In 2010, for example, the Eagle 5 Rifle crossbow made by Master Cutlery was recalled after regulators found it could fire, without pulling the trigger, when the safety is switched off.

But the Consumer Product Safety Commission cannot recall guns. Nor can the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives or the Justice Department.

Guns hold a special place in American life - and American law, says Dallas attorney Jeffrey Hightower.

“Remington polices itself,” he said. “The gun industry polices itself.”

A federal law, passed in 1976 and upheld repeatedly in court, specifically bars the government from setting safety standards for guns, because of the Second Amendment.

Rich Barber says that’s as it should be. He’s a strong supporter of gun rights and is still an avid shooter. He even sometimes shoots Remingtons.

“It is our responsibility as pro-gun individuals to regulate an issue of this nature,” he said. “I am fearful that if the government got involved in this, that they would put such stringent standards on firearms, they'd be so safe, they wouldn't work.”

But now, some are trying to force Remington’s hand. The company is battling two proposed class-action suits demanding a nationwide recall.

Texas attorney Robert Chaffin, who is not involved in the latest suits, says that is easier said than done. He says fixing the Remington 700 has become far more expensive than years ago and now is estimated to cost $75 to $100 per gun.

“So you're talking about a recall campaign that could have cost up to $300 million if it was run to its fullest,” said Chaffin. “Which was actually more than the entire net worth of the company."

That cost would complicate the company’s plans to sell its stock to the public. Since 2007, Remington has been owned by the giant investment firm Cerberus, which had quietly begun buying gun companies the year before.

In October 2009, Cerberus announced plans to sell stock in a new company called Freedom Group, a collection of gun makers built around Remington. Like Remington and DuPont officials, Cerberus officials declined to be interviewed for this report. The company said it couldn’t talk to us about the Remington 700 this close to the public stock offering.

“I don't think anybody wants to go on national TV and lie,” said Barber. “I could say whatever I want. But those documents clearly speak for themselves and they speak volumes about what the company knew, when they knew it, what they did, and what they did not do, and what they continue to do today.

It has been ten years since the death of Barber’s son. He occasionally wishes life could be back the way it was. But he knows that can never be.


Tags: #rifle  #remington 

5 comments
  • Tyler ?
    Tyler ? I have a model 700. Its a 7mm rem ultra! I wonder if it is going to have these problems? Its about 6 or 7 years old cant quite remember.
    October 29, 2010
  • Chris Avena
    Chris Avena I have a model 700 in 308. it is about 20 years old & I have never had a problem with it. It is still my favorite rifle to hunt with & I think that I will continue to use it. I will just have to be more aware. maybe have it checked out as well. Better saf...  more
    October 30, 2010
  • Tyler ?
    Tyler ? Ya you bet! Maybe I will have our local gunsmith have a look at it and see if he knows a bit about it. Thanks Chris.
    October 30, 2010
  • Chris Avena
    Chris Avena Thats what we are here for. Thanks for your input
    October 30, 2010
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