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  • 24 Mar 2017
    Immediate Changes to South African Firearm Registration Guidelines for American Hunters The South African Police Services’ Central Firearms Desk has announced its decision to no longer accept United States Department of Homeland Security Certificates of Registration, commonly known as CBP Form 4457, if the date in the top right had corner of the form has expired. “We encourage all Safari Club members to complete a new CBF Form 4457 before embarking on any international travel with firearms,” said Larry Higgins, President of SCI. “While South Africa is currently the only country to make this decision, others will likely follow suit. Members should ensure their 4457 Form is valid before leaving the U.S.” This new form can be found online here. SCI members with questions should contact the Customs and Border Protection Information Center directly. The CBP INFO Center is open Monday-Friday between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Eastern time. You can ask your question via email or by calling (877) 227-5511. If you are outside the U.S. you must call 1 (202) 325-8000. Those needing additional assistance may contact SCI’s Office of Hunter Advocacy at (202) 543-8733 or may email hunteradvocacy@safariclub.org. SCI also encourages members to defer to the Professional Hunters’ Association of South Africa (PHASA) and their travel protocols when hunting in South Africa. PHASA recommends hunting clients pre-apply, through a reputable, registered meet-and-greet agency, for temporary import/export of firearms and/or transit permits.
    109 Posted by Chris Avena
  • Immediate Changes to South African Firearm Registration Guidelines for American Hunters The South African Police Services’ Central Firearms Desk has announced its decision to no longer accept United States Department of Homeland Security Certificates of Registration, commonly known as CBP Form 4457, if the date in the top right had corner of the form has expired. “We encourage all Safari Club members to complete a new CBF Form 4457 before embarking on any international travel with firearms,” said Larry Higgins, President of SCI. “While South Africa is currently the only country to make this decision, others will likely follow suit. Members should ensure their 4457 Form is valid before leaving the U.S.” This new form can be found online here. SCI members with questions should contact the Customs and Border Protection Information Center directly. The CBP INFO Center is open Monday-Friday between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Eastern time. You can ask your question via email or by calling (877) 227-5511. If you are outside the U.S. you must call 1 (202) 325-8000. Those needing additional assistance may contact SCI’s Office of Hunter Advocacy at (202) 543-8733 or may email hunteradvocacy@safariclub.org. SCI also encourages members to defer to the Professional Hunters’ Association of South Africa (PHASA) and their travel protocols when hunting in South Africa. PHASA recommends hunting clients pre-apply, through a reputable, registered meet-and-greet agency, for temporary import/export of firearms and/or transit permits.
    Mar 24, 2017 109
  • 04 Jul 2016
    We just got back from great adventure my client got his first of the big 5 cape buffalo!!He hunted with a 500 ne Heym dubbel. We did average of +- 20 km a day walking on the buff tracks. In the end hard work paid of. Cant wait too get back in Dark africa getting ready for the nexst hunting client. My hunting concessions Is based in Mozambique west opposite the kruger national park and Zimbabwe famous Gonarezou national park. dwanebooysen@gmail.com We have 2 tags left for Mozambique 10 days hunt Late 2016 special One hunter $9000.00 one Buff. 2 hunters 2 buffs &$16,000.00 This includes foood &drinks Laundry service skinner trackers Ph Accommodation Tags Government Tax Exclude Staff tips Shipping and dipping of trophy Transport to hunting Areas Gun inport
    185 Posted by Dwane Booysen Safaris
  • We just got back from great adventure my client got his first of the big 5 cape buffalo!!He hunted with a 500 ne Heym dubbel. We did average of +- 20 km a day walking on the buff tracks. In the end hard work paid of. Cant wait too get back in Dark africa getting ready for the nexst hunting client. My hunting concessions Is based in Mozambique west opposite the kruger national park and Zimbabwe famous Gonarezou national park. dwanebooysen@gmail.com We have 2 tags left for Mozambique 10 days hunt Late 2016 special One hunter $9000.00 one Buff. 2 hunters 2 buffs &$16,000.00 This includes foood &drinks Laundry service skinner trackers Ph Accommodation Tags Government Tax Exclude Staff tips Shipping and dipping of trophy Transport to hunting Areas Gun inport
    Jul 04, 2016 185
  • 30 Jul 2015
    News Release July 29, 2015 Contact: media@safariclub.org For Immediate Release SCI Suspends Membership of Hunter and Professional Hunter Involved in Death of Cecil Washington, D.C. –   Safari Club International (SCI) supports a full and thorough investigation of the circumstances surrounding the death of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe. SCI has imposed immediate emergency membership suspensions of both the involved hunter and his guide/professional hunter, and they will remain in place pending the outcome of an investigation.   Safari Club International condemns unlawful and unethical hunting practices. SCI supports only legal hunting practices and those who comply with all applicable hunting rules and regulations, and SCI believes that those who intentionally take wildlife illegally should be prosecuted and punished to the maximum extent allowed by law.   Safari Club International is a 501(c)4 corporation, has approximately 47,000 members worldwide, many of whom also hunt worldwide. Safari Club's missions include the conservation of wildlife, protection of the hunter’s rights, and education of the public concerning hunting and its use as a conservation and management tool.   Safari Club International – First For Hunters is the leader in protecting the freedom to hunt and in promoting wildlife conservation worldwide. SCI’s approximately 200 Chapters represent all 50 of the United States as well as 106 other countries. SCI’s proactive leadership in a host of cooperative wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian programs, with the SCI Foundation and other conservation groups, research institutions and government agencies, empowers sportsmen to be contributing community members and participants in sound wildlife management and conservation. Visit the home page www.safariclub.org or call (520) 620-1220 for more information
    4409 Posted by Chris Avena
  • News Release July 29, 2015 Contact: media@safariclub.org For Immediate Release SCI Suspends Membership of Hunter and Professional Hunter Involved in Death of Cecil Washington, D.C. –   Safari Club International (SCI) supports a full and thorough investigation of the circumstances surrounding the death of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe. SCI has imposed immediate emergency membership suspensions of both the involved hunter and his guide/professional hunter, and they will remain in place pending the outcome of an investigation.   Safari Club International condemns unlawful and unethical hunting practices. SCI supports only legal hunting practices and those who comply with all applicable hunting rules and regulations, and SCI believes that those who intentionally take wildlife illegally should be prosecuted and punished to the maximum extent allowed by law.   Safari Club International is a 501(c)4 corporation, has approximately 47,000 members worldwide, many of whom also hunt worldwide. Safari Club's missions include the conservation of wildlife, protection of the hunter’s rights, and education of the public concerning hunting and its use as a conservation and management tool.   Safari Club International – First For Hunters is the leader in protecting the freedom to hunt and in promoting wildlife conservation worldwide. SCI’s approximately 200 Chapters represent all 50 of the United States as well as 106 other countries. SCI’s proactive leadership in a host of cooperative wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian programs, with the SCI Foundation and other conservation groups, research institutions and government agencies, empowers sportsmen to be contributing community members and participants in sound wildlife management and conservation. Visit the home page www.safariclub.org or call (520) 620-1220 for more information
    Jul 30, 2015 4409
  • 19 Nov 2014
    Club's Black Rhino Hunt Awaits Federal Permit   Posted Tuesday, November 18th 2014 @ 5am by iHeartRadio's Nik Rajkovic   The federal government could force the Dallas Safari Club to scrap it's controversial Black Rhino hunt which fetched $350,000 at auction early this year.   The Club says it may have to return the money to the auction winner if his federal application to bring his trophy back to Texas is rejected. “We want to know what benefits will be provided to go back to the species,” says Tim Van Norman with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “So its not just an animal is taken, but is that provided something for the long term management of the species?”   “In the case of Corey Knowlton, he is contributing a large sum of money that will go into Namibia's wildlife management fund specifically providing resources for ongoing Black Rhino efforts,” he tells KTRH News.   Comments on the application are being taken through December 8. “We certainly are getting quite a few that are opposed to it, but these are more of just a letter-writing campaign expressing dissatisfaction with the idea of hunting Black Rhino,” says Van Norman.   Messages seeking comment from the auction winner were not returned. Read more: http://www.ktrh.com/articles/houston-news-121300/clubs-black-rhino-hunt-awaits-federal-12981146/#ixzz3JWu6vEaZ
    13073 Posted by Chris Avena
  • Club's Black Rhino Hunt Awaits Federal Permit   Posted Tuesday, November 18th 2014 @ 5am by iHeartRadio's Nik Rajkovic   The federal government could force the Dallas Safari Club to scrap it's controversial Black Rhino hunt which fetched $350,000 at auction early this year.   The Club says it may have to return the money to the auction winner if his federal application to bring his trophy back to Texas is rejected. “We want to know what benefits will be provided to go back to the species,” says Tim Van Norman with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “So its not just an animal is taken, but is that provided something for the long term management of the species?”   “In the case of Corey Knowlton, he is contributing a large sum of money that will go into Namibia's wildlife management fund specifically providing resources for ongoing Black Rhino efforts,” he tells KTRH News.   Comments on the application are being taken through December 8. “We certainly are getting quite a few that are opposed to it, but these are more of just a letter-writing campaign expressing dissatisfaction with the idea of hunting Black Rhino,” says Van Norman.   Messages seeking comment from the auction winner were not returned. Read more: http://www.ktrh.com/articles/houston-news-121300/clubs-black-rhino-hunt-awaits-federal-12981146/#ixzz3JWu6vEaZ
    Nov 19, 2014 13073
  • 21 May 2014
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    880 Posted by admin
  • By admin
    test
    May 21, 2014 880
  • 02 Apr 2014
    Firearms Industry Economic ImpactNearly Doubles in Five Years NEWTOWN, Conn. – The total economic impact of the firearms and ammunition industry in the United States increased from $19.1 billion in 2008 to $37.7 billion in 2013, a 97 percent increase, while the total number of full-time equivalent jobs rose from more than 166,000 to more than 245,000, a 48 percent increase in that five-year period, according to a new report released today by the National Shooting Sports Foundation, the industry’s trade association. “We have seen dramatic, unprecedented during peacetime growth in the firearms and ammunition industry that is the direct result of consumer demand for our products in the last five years,” said Stephen L. Sanetti, NSSF president and chief executive officer. “While our nation’s overall economic recovery has been slow since 2008, our industry has been a true bright spot, increasing our direct workforce by nearly half, adding jobs that pay an average of more than $47,700 in wages and benefits. Supplier and induced jobs* were also increased by about half since 2008, even as we increased federal tax payments by 93 percent, Pittman-Robertson excise taxes that support wildlife conservation by 83 percent and state business taxes by 77 percent.” The Firearms and Ammunition Industry Economic Impact Report: 2013 provides a state by state breakdown of job numbers, wages and output covering direct, supplier and induced employment, as well as federal excise taxes paid. Access the full report here. * Induced jobs are those created by the economic impact made by the industry. -30- About NSSFThe National Shooting Sports Foundation is the trade association for the firearms industry. Its mission is to promote, protect and preserve hunting and the shooting sports. Formed in 1961, NSSF has a membership of more than 10,000 manufacturers, distributors, firearms retailers, shooting ranges, sportsmen's organizations and publishers. For more information, log on to www.nssf.org.  
    1225 Posted by Chris Avena
  • Firearms Industry Economic ImpactNearly Doubles in Five Years NEWTOWN, Conn. – The total economic impact of the firearms and ammunition industry in the United States increased from $19.1 billion in 2008 to $37.7 billion in 2013, a 97 percent increase, while the total number of full-time equivalent jobs rose from more than 166,000 to more than 245,000, a 48 percent increase in that five-year period, according to a new report released today by the National Shooting Sports Foundation, the industry’s trade association. “We have seen dramatic, unprecedented during peacetime growth in the firearms and ammunition industry that is the direct result of consumer demand for our products in the last five years,” said Stephen L. Sanetti, NSSF president and chief executive officer. “While our nation’s overall economic recovery has been slow since 2008, our industry has been a true bright spot, increasing our direct workforce by nearly half, adding jobs that pay an average of more than $47,700 in wages and benefits. Supplier and induced jobs* were also increased by about half since 2008, even as we increased federal tax payments by 93 percent, Pittman-Robertson excise taxes that support wildlife conservation by 83 percent and state business taxes by 77 percent.” The Firearms and Ammunition Industry Economic Impact Report: 2013 provides a state by state breakdown of job numbers, wages and output covering direct, supplier and induced employment, as well as federal excise taxes paid. Access the full report here. * Induced jobs are those created by the economic impact made by the industry. -30- About NSSFThe National Shooting Sports Foundation is the trade association for the firearms industry. Its mission is to promote, protect and preserve hunting and the shooting sports. Formed in 1961, NSSF has a membership of more than 10,000 manufacturers, distributors, firearms retailers, shooting ranges, sportsmen's organizations and publishers. For more information, log on to www.nssf.org.  
    Apr 02, 2014 1225
  • 09 Feb 2014
    October 2012, World’s Largest Land Mammal & Most Dangerous Hunt;   The Tuskless Cow Elephant! By~Marti Mace    The drive down the escarpment into the Zambezi Valley was superb.  Soon we were on our way through the thorn bush, on a drive to camp.  On way we saw a pride of lion’s, parade of elephants, herd of cape buffalo, rank of impala, leopard, bushbok, warthogs, etc.  This was definitely big game country, having seen 4 of the Big Five on 1st afternoon.  We reached camp just at nightfall.  There is no real twilight in Africa, it’s bright and sunny one minute and dark minutes later.      The next thing we took off at 0400 hrs every morning and only ran into tusk elephant’s for 5 days straight with boots on ground going appx 5-8 up to 10 km’s a day, then day 6 and just within the 1st couple of hours…we ran into many spoors and followed them, 3 elephant’s, then found out they were with tusk, so walked a little further and ran into another herd.  Again, they were with tusk, so we were on our way back to the bakke…then appx 25 elephant’s appeared…we glassed the herd and 1 of them was tuskless…wow, what’s the chance…the big grey tuskless cow elephant seemed huge as I peered through my Bushnell binoculars, so here I go…wiping sweat off my hands…pouring on some powder (wind check powder) at appx 1030 hours this 21 Oct 2012.  Appx 25 tusk elephants were all around and I cautiously waited for the clean shot on only 1 was tuskless.  PH, APH, X 3 Trackers and game scout were a little irritated that I didn’t make a shot when they wanted me to.  I had 25ish elephant’s all around the only tuskless cow and I only shoot when I know it will be a clean shot.  Appx 6-8 elephant’s were grouped around a Mupani tree and my elephant would go forward, then back and then another elephant was right in front of one I wanted to shoot.  So I was waiting for either the one in front of mine to move or mine had to move forward a waise for me to make a clean shot.  It was a scorcher of high temp of 129 degrees F.  I had practiced daily with my Hoyt Alphamax 32" bow, pulling 74 lbs, using a 675.7 grain arrow that I had made with a ACE 550 arrow inside of the Gold Tip Big Game hunting 100+ arrow with electrical tape every few inches around ACE 550 arrow so that it would fit tightly inside of the Gold Tip Arrow, then I added weight to front and back to get as much weight on arrow as possible.  I looked into the most suitable options with regard to arrow & broadhead choice for my particular bow set up, a crucial factor when hunting elephant in this manner.  I had specially ordered in the 180gr German Kenetic broadheads out of Alaska as I couldn’t get them at home in Wyoming.  With my bow set up and tuned to perfection, I spent some much needed time at the range from 10-100 yards daily.  I take this to heart to try and eliminate all possible human errors before going on the hunt.  My arrows were shooting through my chronograph at 267 fps.  I did the calculations and was very happy with the outcome of kinetic energy and a momentum value, which gave me a piece of mind.   I felt surprisingly confident.  Here I was standing on a pile of rocks in the Zambezi Valley with a firm grip on my right hand fingers holding the string of my bow…thinking to myself…is my arrow heavy enough as a couple other’s told me that I needed a 900gr arrow at a minimum or it would riquichet off elephant.  No matter what, I added all the weight I could on my arrows that I made, so I was still ok with it.  Then thinking…about my poundage of my bow…was it going to be good enough.  Other’s told me that I need to pull 80-100 lbs and 66 was pushing it for me, then daily pushups, body lifting, pec’s, etc to build up to the 74 lb pull and it is very hard for me even now to pull this bow.  I have to pull it high in the sky to get the bow pulled fully, then I just bring it down to sight in.  I felt this is ok for a hunt of a lifetime for the World’s Largest and Most Dangerous of all.  At 51 yrs old, I feel I was ready to find out if I could do this.  If not, then it would just be another plan to make it happen later.  I studied the African animal vitals and the required shot placement everyday since the beginning of 2011.  Closing my eyes and visualizing the elephant at various distances and standing in different positions…still thinking what struck me about these elephant’s when you are on foot; their size alone is more than enough to make you doubt your equipment, let alone their reputation as the toughest big game to hunt in the world…Anyway, everyone stayed quiet, the wind was in our favor blowing toward us as we approached, then my PH said, ok, you ready to shoot, you can do it, you’ll be fine.  He kept saying, are you going to shoot?  I said, I’m waiting for clean shot.  I did knock my arrow although…I don’t shoot anything unless I’m confident with the position and with 25 elephant’s in front of me…I’v gota make sure as only one of these are tuskless and it must be the tuskless cow or it’s a $5000 fine if I shoot a tusk cow.  I am the hunter, so I just made all of them impatiently wait for me to make the shot.        The split moment came…I pull my bow up and back and then focus in on my elephant’s heart, My focus stays on my 20 yard pin at same time as keeping eye on other close elephants just to her mid section.  I had to be quick as another elephant was just behind her front leg, so I had to make an exact shot for the heart.  I controlled my breathing and squeezed the trigger of my tru ball cyclon release.  I released the arrow and elephant did a 360 pivoting in place then dropped to the ground, in the shade under a Mupani Tree.  Mupani and Baobab trees and Wooley Kaper bushes were in abundance at this location.  I knew I had the right shot placement and I was so proud at that point.  Her hind legs immediately went down, then front and then boom…all the way down on her left side.  The matriarch of the Parade came to see if she could help her up…well, the tuskless cow never got back up and the matriarch left and all elephant’s went North up the ridge and away from us.  I had been determined that the 1st shot would count, as not only the PH, then the APH and 1 of the trackers had their .458 Winchester rifles with them.  The PH told me afterwards that the trackers were itching to get a shot & were somewhat disappointed that their marksmanship was not required.  Then subsequent inspection, the arrow was right on target and fletching’s were all that was sticking out, so I knew it hit the heart.  When she fell, the ground rumbled and I heard her make her last bellows and within just a few minutes, she had expired.  The thrill of shooting this ele flowed through me…over me, etc.  It was such an awesome thrill that neither my 1st solo flight in a Cessna 150 or my 1st parachute jump out of a C130 could match this feeling!  This was the ultimate experience as a 1st solo doesn’t make you a pilot, nor one jump a parachutist, neither does an elephant make you an expert big game hunter.  Never less, this was my elephant as well as my Alligator for another one of my most dangerous hunts.  I have achieved another one of my childhood ambitions!  My PH said congratulations with a hug and I was just so excited that finally I got the World’s largest and most dangerous down with a bow and arrow.  I am so proud of myself and blessed that I didn’t let the other people get to me telling me, I can’t, cause I’m a girl, or I needed more poundage or heavier arrows to get in the way.        I walked away from the crowd to the nearest baobab tree and took a moment of silence, I took off my hat, kneeled, closed my eyes to thank our creator for allowing me this amazing opportunity to hunt the World’s largest and most dangerous animal and blessing the Shona Tribe as now they can nourish their bodies.        After a quick photo session, the Shona Tribe came out of the bush to begin the slaughtering.  The African Sun was hot at 129 degrees F.  So the Shona had to work fast.  Machetes and knives flying and sticking out of their pockets, so a quick switch when the other blade got dull.  I went out to tell them in their Shona Language, Tatenda, Maita Balsa (thank you very much) for all the help and now you all are blessed with meat and they danced and sang for me the song that you are the one, you are the best hunter & shooter.        Then Women, kids, elderly and men all formed up line’s to receive a bag of meat.  They all bring their gunnysack to fill up with meat.  3 different lines are formed.  One with elderly, one for women with children and other for women & men.  The elderly are given 1st so they can get walking back to their villages as most take longer & to get back before dark, then women with children.  Women with babies strapped to their backs, put a bag of meat on top their heads and walk to their village and some many kilometers away.        Furthermore, we all hop into the PH’s Toyota diesel land cruiser with the PH dressed in bush hat, chukka boots, the epitome of a professional hunter as well as the apprentice PH  and rest of crew.  We all were drenched with sweat, smiles and singing.        Got back to camp and we gathered by the bush fire with celebratory drinks of gin and tonic’s, grouse whiskey shots, and we chatted about the bush university that we all attended at some point in our lives.        The next few days, we listened to the camp Motorola 2 way radio with Dande North on the frequency as well.  They didn’t have any luck getting a tuskless elephant down on Dande North, and as many tries I’ve had, this is the very first tuskless elephant that’s came across me in 2 years of searching.  Only 3% of tuskless are left in the world and they want to reduce it to zero as these are the most dangerous elephant’s on the face of the earth.        Meanwhile, I make video’s, make calendar’s, cards, etc. on my awesome elephant hunt & prepare going back to the U.S.A.  After I’ve been here since end of July managing a Safari in Zimbabwe near the boarder of Zambia and Mozambique.   They say if you hunt Africa you will keep on returning again and again.   Blessings to all, MSG Mace (Soon to be retired) I promise!
    9278 Posted by Marti Mace
  • October 2012, World’s Largest Land Mammal & Most Dangerous Hunt;   The Tuskless Cow Elephant! By~Marti Mace    The drive down the escarpment into the Zambezi Valley was superb.  Soon we were on our way through the thorn bush, on a drive to camp.  On way we saw a pride of lion’s, parade of elephants, herd of cape buffalo, rank of impala, leopard, bushbok, warthogs, etc.  This was definitely big game country, having seen 4 of the Big Five on 1st afternoon.  We reached camp just at nightfall.  There is no real twilight in Africa, it’s bright and sunny one minute and dark minutes later.      The next thing we took off at 0400 hrs every morning and only ran into tusk elephant’s for 5 days straight with boots on ground going appx 5-8 up to 10 km’s a day, then day 6 and just within the 1st couple of hours…we ran into many spoors and followed them, 3 elephant’s, then found out they were with tusk, so walked a little further and ran into another herd.  Again, they were with tusk, so we were on our way back to the bakke…then appx 25 elephant’s appeared…we glassed the herd and 1 of them was tuskless…wow, what’s the chance…the big grey tuskless cow elephant seemed huge as I peered through my Bushnell binoculars, so here I go…wiping sweat off my hands…pouring on some powder (wind check powder) at appx 1030 hours this 21 Oct 2012.  Appx 25 tusk elephants were all around and I cautiously waited for the clean shot on only 1 was tuskless.  PH, APH, X 3 Trackers and game scout were a little irritated that I didn’t make a shot when they wanted me to.  I had 25ish elephant’s all around the only tuskless cow and I only shoot when I know it will be a clean shot.  Appx 6-8 elephant’s were grouped around a Mupani tree and my elephant would go forward, then back and then another elephant was right in front of one I wanted to shoot.  So I was waiting for either the one in front of mine to move or mine had to move forward a waise for me to make a clean shot.  It was a scorcher of high temp of 129 degrees F.  I had practiced daily with my Hoyt Alphamax 32" bow, pulling 74 lbs, using a 675.7 grain arrow that I had made with a ACE 550 arrow inside of the Gold Tip Big Game hunting 100+ arrow with electrical tape every few inches around ACE 550 arrow so that it would fit tightly inside of the Gold Tip Arrow, then I added weight to front and back to get as much weight on arrow as possible.  I looked into the most suitable options with regard to arrow & broadhead choice for my particular bow set up, a crucial factor when hunting elephant in this manner.  I had specially ordered in the 180gr German Kenetic broadheads out of Alaska as I couldn’t get them at home in Wyoming.  With my bow set up and tuned to perfection, I spent some much needed time at the range from 10-100 yards daily.  I take this to heart to try and eliminate all possible human errors before going on the hunt.  My arrows were shooting through my chronograph at 267 fps.  I did the calculations and was very happy with the outcome of kinetic energy and a momentum value, which gave me a piece of mind.   I felt surprisingly confident.  Here I was standing on a pile of rocks in the Zambezi Valley with a firm grip on my right hand fingers holding the string of my bow…thinking to myself…is my arrow heavy enough as a couple other’s told me that I needed a 900gr arrow at a minimum or it would riquichet off elephant.  No matter what, I added all the weight I could on my arrows that I made, so I was still ok with it.  Then thinking…about my poundage of my bow…was it going to be good enough.  Other’s told me that I need to pull 80-100 lbs and 66 was pushing it for me, then daily pushups, body lifting, pec’s, etc to build up to the 74 lb pull and it is very hard for me even now to pull this bow.  I have to pull it high in the sky to get the bow pulled fully, then I just bring it down to sight in.  I felt this is ok for a hunt of a lifetime for the World’s Largest and Most Dangerous of all.  At 51 yrs old, I feel I was ready to find out if I could do this.  If not, then it would just be another plan to make it happen later.  I studied the African animal vitals and the required shot placement everyday since the beginning of 2011.  Closing my eyes and visualizing the elephant at various distances and standing in different positions…still thinking what struck me about these elephant’s when you are on foot; their size alone is more than enough to make you doubt your equipment, let alone their reputation as the toughest big game to hunt in the world…Anyway, everyone stayed quiet, the wind was in our favor blowing toward us as we approached, then my PH said, ok, you ready to shoot, you can do it, you’ll be fine.  He kept saying, are you going to shoot?  I said, I’m waiting for clean shot.  I did knock my arrow although…I don’t shoot anything unless I’m confident with the position and with 25 elephant’s in front of me…I’v gota make sure as only one of these are tuskless and it must be the tuskless cow or it’s a $5000 fine if I shoot a tusk cow.  I am the hunter, so I just made all of them impatiently wait for me to make the shot.        The split moment came…I pull my bow up and back and then focus in on my elephant’s heart, My focus stays on my 20 yard pin at same time as keeping eye on other close elephants just to her mid section.  I had to be quick as another elephant was just behind her front leg, so I had to make an exact shot for the heart.  I controlled my breathing and squeezed the trigger of my tru ball cyclon release.  I released the arrow and elephant did a 360 pivoting in place then dropped to the ground, in the shade under a Mupani Tree.  Mupani and Baobab trees and Wooley Kaper bushes were in abundance at this location.  I knew I had the right shot placement and I was so proud at that point.  Her hind legs immediately went down, then front and then boom…all the way down on her left side.  The matriarch of the Parade came to see if she could help her up…well, the tuskless cow never got back up and the matriarch left and all elephant’s went North up the ridge and away from us.  I had been determined that the 1st shot would count, as not only the PH, then the APH and 1 of the trackers had their .458 Winchester rifles with them.  The PH told me afterwards that the trackers were itching to get a shot & were somewhat disappointed that their marksmanship was not required.  Then subsequent inspection, the arrow was right on target and fletching’s were all that was sticking out, so I knew it hit the heart.  When she fell, the ground rumbled and I heard her make her last bellows and within just a few minutes, she had expired.  The thrill of shooting this ele flowed through me…over me, etc.  It was such an awesome thrill that neither my 1st solo flight in a Cessna 150 or my 1st parachute jump out of a C130 could match this feeling!  This was the ultimate experience as a 1st solo doesn’t make you a pilot, nor one jump a parachutist, neither does an elephant make you an expert big game hunter.  Never less, this was my elephant as well as my Alligator for another one of my most dangerous hunts.  I have achieved another one of my childhood ambitions!  My PH said congratulations with a hug and I was just so excited that finally I got the World’s largest and most dangerous down with a bow and arrow.  I am so proud of myself and blessed that I didn’t let the other people get to me telling me, I can’t, cause I’m a girl, or I needed more poundage or heavier arrows to get in the way.        I walked away from the crowd to the nearest baobab tree and took a moment of silence, I took off my hat, kneeled, closed my eyes to thank our creator for allowing me this amazing opportunity to hunt the World’s largest and most dangerous animal and blessing the Shona Tribe as now they can nourish their bodies.        After a quick photo session, the Shona Tribe came out of the bush to begin the slaughtering.  The African Sun was hot at 129 degrees F.  So the Shona had to work fast.  Machetes and knives flying and sticking out of their pockets, so a quick switch when the other blade got dull.  I went out to tell them in their Shona Language, Tatenda, Maita Balsa (thank you very much) for all the help and now you all are blessed with meat and they danced and sang for me the song that you are the one, you are the best hunter & shooter.        Then Women, kids, elderly and men all formed up line’s to receive a bag of meat.  They all bring their gunnysack to fill up with meat.  3 different lines are formed.  One with elderly, one for women with children and other for women & men.  The elderly are given 1st so they can get walking back to their villages as most take longer & to get back before dark, then women with children.  Women with babies strapped to their backs, put a bag of meat on top their heads and walk to their village and some many kilometers away.        Furthermore, we all hop into the PH’s Toyota diesel land cruiser with the PH dressed in bush hat, chukka boots, the epitome of a professional hunter as well as the apprentice PH  and rest of crew.  We all were drenched with sweat, smiles and singing.        Got back to camp and we gathered by the bush fire with celebratory drinks of gin and tonic’s, grouse whiskey shots, and we chatted about the bush university that we all attended at some point in our lives.        The next few days, we listened to the camp Motorola 2 way radio with Dande North on the frequency as well.  They didn’t have any luck getting a tuskless elephant down on Dande North, and as many tries I’ve had, this is the very first tuskless elephant that’s came across me in 2 years of searching.  Only 3% of tuskless are left in the world and they want to reduce it to zero as these are the most dangerous elephant’s on the face of the earth.        Meanwhile, I make video’s, make calendar’s, cards, etc. on my awesome elephant hunt & prepare going back to the U.S.A.  After I’ve been here since end of July managing a Safari in Zimbabwe near the boarder of Zambia and Mozambique.   They say if you hunt Africa you will keep on returning again and again.   Blessings to all, MSG Mace (Soon to be retired) I promise!
    Feb 09, 2014 9278
  • 08 Oct 2013
          ZEISS Wins Petersen’s Editor’s Choice Award for TERRA 3X Riflescopes NORTH CHESTERFIELD, Va. (October 7, 2013) – Carl Zeiss Sports Optics, the world's leading manufacturer of high performance sports optics has won the 2014 Annual Petersen’s Hunting Editor’s Choice Award for its new line of TERRA 3X riflescopes.   The editorial staff of Petersen’s Hunting magazine has recognized the ZEISS TERRA 3X Riflescopes for offering the highest quality, the most innovative design, and the best utility for today’s hunter.  Petersen’s Hunting, published by InterMedia Outdoors, is one of the leading magazines for serious hunting enthusiasts in the United States.   “Being good is no longer good enough in the outdoor industry,” said David Faubion, Associate Editor of Petersen's Hunting. “Your product [TERRA 3X Riflescopes] greatly exceeded our expectations of what constitutes top-quality outdoor gear. Because of this, we have selected the TERRA 3X riflescopes as the Editor’s Choice Award in its respective category for our annual 2014 Editor’s Choice Awards.”   “This is an incredible honor and we thank Petersen’s Hunting for selecting TERRA 3X riflescopes for this award,” said Mike Jensen, President of Carl Zeiss Sports Optics. “This has been an unprecedented year for our organization. Carl Zeiss Sport Optics has accomplished what no other optics manufacturer has ever done: winning prestigious awards in three binocular categories with three different lines and now this award from Petersen’s Hunting for our new TERRA riflescope line.  This confirms that Carl Zeiss Sports Optics is truly the leader in premium, high performance sports optics.”   According to Jensen, TERRA 3X riflescopes offer all the benefits of German quality, design, engineering and performance that hunters from around the world expect from ZEISS.  Starting at only $349 (street price), the new ZEISS TERRA 3X riflescopes outperform many other brands by featuring best-in-class image quality, comfortable ergonomics, durable construction, and are backed by Carl Zeiss’ U.S. Limited Lifetime Warranty. ZEISS TERRA 3X riflescopes are currently available in the following models:   Available TERRA 3X Riflescope Models:                                MSRP:   TERRA  2-7x32  Z-Plex Reticle                                       $388.00 TERRA  3-9x42  Z-Plex Reticle                                       $444.00 TERRA  3-9x42  RZ6 Ballistic Reticle                            $499.00 TERRA  4-12x42 Z-Plex Reticle                                      $499.00 TERRA  4-12x42 RZ8 Ballistic Reticle                           $555.00     For more information on ZEISS products please visit www.zeiss.com/sports or join the company’s official Facebook page at facebook.com/CarlZeissHuntingUS.   Carl Zeiss Sports Optics   Carl Zeiss Sports Optics is a leading, international provider of premium sports optics and part of the Consumer Optics Group of Carl Zeiss. Carl Zeiss Sports Optics, LLC is responsible for sales, marketing and distribution of its state-of-the-art binoculars, spotting scopes, riflescopes and laser rangefinders throughout the United States and Canada. Carl Zeiss Sports Optics’ North American headquarters is located in North Chesterfield, Va.   About Carl Zeiss Group   The Carl Zeiss Group is an international leader in the fields of optics and optoelectronics. In fiscal year 2011-2012 the company's approximately 24,000 employees generated revenue of nearly 4.2 billion euros. In the markets for Industrial Solutions, Research Solutions, Medical Technology and Consumer Optics, Carl Zeiss has contributed to technological progress for more than 160 years and enhances the quality of life of many people around the globe.   The Carl Zeiss Group develops and produces planetariums, eyeglass lenses, camera and cine lenses and binoculars as well as solutions for biomedical research, medical technology and the semiconductor, automotive and mechanical engineering industries. Carl Zeiss is present in more than 40 countries around the globe with about 40 production facilities, over 50 sales and service locations and service locations and approximately 20 research and development sites. Carl Zeiss AG is fully owned by the Carl Zeiss Stiftung (Carl Zeiss Foundation). Founded in 1846 in Jena, the company is headquartered in Oberkochen, Germany.   Contact for media and press relations:   Joel Harris Carl Zeiss Sports Optics Phone: (804) 425-8466 Email: joel.harris@zeiss.com www.zeiss.com/press www.zeiss.com/sports www.facebook.com/CarlZeissHuntingUS    
    4565 Posted by Chris Avena
  •       ZEISS Wins Petersen’s Editor’s Choice Award for TERRA 3X Riflescopes NORTH CHESTERFIELD, Va. (October 7, 2013) – Carl Zeiss Sports Optics, the world's leading manufacturer of high performance sports optics has won the 2014 Annual Petersen’s Hunting Editor’s Choice Award for its new line of TERRA 3X riflescopes.   The editorial staff of Petersen’s Hunting magazine has recognized the ZEISS TERRA 3X Riflescopes for offering the highest quality, the most innovative design, and the best utility for today’s hunter.  Petersen’s Hunting, published by InterMedia Outdoors, is one of the leading magazines for serious hunting enthusiasts in the United States.   “Being good is no longer good enough in the outdoor industry,” said David Faubion, Associate Editor of Petersen's Hunting. “Your product [TERRA 3X Riflescopes] greatly exceeded our expectations of what constitutes top-quality outdoor gear. Because of this, we have selected the TERRA 3X riflescopes as the Editor’s Choice Award in its respective category for our annual 2014 Editor’s Choice Awards.”   “This is an incredible honor and we thank Petersen’s Hunting for selecting TERRA 3X riflescopes for this award,” said Mike Jensen, President of Carl Zeiss Sports Optics. “This has been an unprecedented year for our organization. Carl Zeiss Sport Optics has accomplished what no other optics manufacturer has ever done: winning prestigious awards in three binocular categories with three different lines and now this award from Petersen’s Hunting for our new TERRA riflescope line.  This confirms that Carl Zeiss Sports Optics is truly the leader in premium, high performance sports optics.”   According to Jensen, TERRA 3X riflescopes offer all the benefits of German quality, design, engineering and performance that hunters from around the world expect from ZEISS.  Starting at only $349 (street price), the new ZEISS TERRA 3X riflescopes outperform many other brands by featuring best-in-class image quality, comfortable ergonomics, durable construction, and are backed by Carl Zeiss’ U.S. Limited Lifetime Warranty. ZEISS TERRA 3X riflescopes are currently available in the following models:   Available TERRA 3X Riflescope Models:                                MSRP:   TERRA  2-7x32  Z-Plex Reticle                                       $388.00 TERRA  3-9x42  Z-Plex Reticle                                       $444.00 TERRA  3-9x42  RZ6 Ballistic Reticle                            $499.00 TERRA  4-12x42 Z-Plex Reticle                                      $499.00 TERRA  4-12x42 RZ8 Ballistic Reticle                           $555.00     For more information on ZEISS products please visit www.zeiss.com/sports or join the company’s official Facebook page at facebook.com/CarlZeissHuntingUS.   Carl Zeiss Sports Optics   Carl Zeiss Sports Optics is a leading, international provider of premium sports optics and part of the Consumer Optics Group of Carl Zeiss. Carl Zeiss Sports Optics, LLC is responsible for sales, marketing and distribution of its state-of-the-art binoculars, spotting scopes, riflescopes and laser rangefinders throughout the United States and Canada. Carl Zeiss Sports Optics’ North American headquarters is located in North Chesterfield, Va.   About Carl Zeiss Group   The Carl Zeiss Group is an international leader in the fields of optics and optoelectronics. In fiscal year 2011-2012 the company's approximately 24,000 employees generated revenue of nearly 4.2 billion euros. In the markets for Industrial Solutions, Research Solutions, Medical Technology and Consumer Optics, Carl Zeiss has contributed to technological progress for more than 160 years and enhances the quality of life of many people around the globe.   The Carl Zeiss Group develops and produces planetariums, eyeglass lenses, camera and cine lenses and binoculars as well as solutions for biomedical research, medical technology and the semiconductor, automotive and mechanical engineering industries. Carl Zeiss is present in more than 40 countries around the globe with about 40 production facilities, over 50 sales and service locations and service locations and approximately 20 research and development sites. Carl Zeiss AG is fully owned by the Carl Zeiss Stiftung (Carl Zeiss Foundation). Founded in 1846 in Jena, the company is headquartered in Oberkochen, Germany.   Contact for media and press relations:   Joel Harris Carl Zeiss Sports Optics Phone: (804) 425-8466 Email: joel.harris@zeiss.com www.zeiss.com/press www.zeiss.com/sports www.facebook.com/CarlZeissHuntingUS    
    Oct 08, 2013 4565
  • 16 May 2013
    Father, son sentenced to prison for rhino horn trafficking A father and son have been sentenced to prison in a rhino horn trafficking case. Above, federal wildlife agents seized more than $2 million in cash, gold bars and precious stones, along with rhino horns, hoofs and other body parts, while breaking up an international smuggling ring in February 2012. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / February 23, 2012)   By Victoria Kim May 15, 2013, 4:52 p.m.   Saying she wanted to send a message against the “extremely serious” crime of trafficking in rhinoceros horns, a federal judge on Wednesday sentenced a father and son to nearly four years in prison for selling hundreds of pounds of horns highly prized in Vietnam and China as a cancer cure. Judge Christina Snyder remarked that she had traveled to Africa and personally witnessed the effects of poaching, as she sentenced Vinh Chuong "Jimmy" Kha and Felix Kha to 42 months and 46 months in prison, respectively. The Khas, who prosecutors said “sat at the apex of the rhino horn smuggling pyramid within the United States,” pleaded guilty last year to charges including conspiracy, smuggling, wildlife trafficking, money laundering and tax evasion for their part in the trade. “There are parts of Africa where rhinos are completely gone,” the judge said from the bench. “Lord knows if they’ll ever come back.” Snyder however shaved more than a year off each of the men’s sentences after listening to descriptions of their lives and pleas from their family. An attorney for Jimmy Kha, the 50-year-old father, described how his client fled the communist rule in Vietnam then built a new life in the U.S. by waiting tables and working at swap meets while raising two sons as a single father. The Khas were never in direct contact with poachers and dealt primarily with horns that were decades old that people already had in their homes in the U.S., Evan Freed, the father's attorney, told the judge. “His rationalization was that … what he was doing was not as bad as the actual slaughter of animals,” Freed said. Felix Kha told the judge he stumbled across the horns an auction site while searching for items for his father’s Westminster business, which sells Buddhist and Chinese cultural artifacts. He said he did not realize the sale would be illegal. But prosecutors contended that by creating a market for the horns, the Khas were directly responsible for driving up prices and creating the incentive for poachers to hunt rhinos. They said the period that the Khas were trading in the horns, beginning in 2008, coincided with a dramatic increase of poaching in South Africa. They also noted that the pair indirectly paid a $150,000 bribe to a Vietnamese official who had stopped a shipment of the horns, which can net up to $25,000 a pound. “Even though these defendants didn’t travel to Africa, their fingers might as well have been on the triggers of poachers’ guns,” Asst. U.S. Atty Joseph Johns said. “We may be dealing with this carnage and this slaughter for another decade.” The men were also ordered to pay taxes owed as well as a fine of $10,000 each. The Khas were arrested as a result of Operation Crash, an 18-month investigation into the trafficking of rhino horns that led to arrests in a dozen states. 
    937 Posted by Chris Avena
  • Father, son sentenced to prison for rhino horn trafficking A father and son have been sentenced to prison in a rhino horn trafficking case. Above, federal wildlife agents seized more than $2 million in cash, gold bars and precious stones, along with rhino horns, hoofs and other body parts, while breaking up an international smuggling ring in February 2012. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / February 23, 2012)   By Victoria Kim May 15, 2013, 4:52 p.m.   Saying she wanted to send a message against the “extremely serious” crime of trafficking in rhinoceros horns, a federal judge on Wednesday sentenced a father and son to nearly four years in prison for selling hundreds of pounds of horns highly prized in Vietnam and China as a cancer cure. Judge Christina Snyder remarked that she had traveled to Africa and personally witnessed the effects of poaching, as she sentenced Vinh Chuong "Jimmy" Kha and Felix Kha to 42 months and 46 months in prison, respectively. The Khas, who prosecutors said “sat at the apex of the rhino horn smuggling pyramid within the United States,” pleaded guilty last year to charges including conspiracy, smuggling, wildlife trafficking, money laundering and tax evasion for their part in the trade. “There are parts of Africa where rhinos are completely gone,” the judge said from the bench. “Lord knows if they’ll ever come back.” Snyder however shaved more than a year off each of the men’s sentences after listening to descriptions of their lives and pleas from their family. An attorney for Jimmy Kha, the 50-year-old father, described how his client fled the communist rule in Vietnam then built a new life in the U.S. by waiting tables and working at swap meets while raising two sons as a single father. The Khas were never in direct contact with poachers and dealt primarily with horns that were decades old that people already had in their homes in the U.S., Evan Freed, the father's attorney, told the judge. “His rationalization was that … what he was doing was not as bad as the actual slaughter of animals,” Freed said. Felix Kha told the judge he stumbled across the horns an auction site while searching for items for his father’s Westminster business, which sells Buddhist and Chinese cultural artifacts. He said he did not realize the sale would be illegal. But prosecutors contended that by creating a market for the horns, the Khas were directly responsible for driving up prices and creating the incentive for poachers to hunt rhinos. They said the period that the Khas were trading in the horns, beginning in 2008, coincided with a dramatic increase of poaching in South Africa. They also noted that the pair indirectly paid a $150,000 bribe to a Vietnamese official who had stopped a shipment of the horns, which can net up to $25,000 a pound. “Even though these defendants didn’t travel to Africa, their fingers might as well have been on the triggers of poachers’ guns,” Asst. U.S. Atty Joseph Johns said. “We may be dealing with this carnage and this slaughter for another decade.” The men were also ordered to pay taxes owed as well as a fine of $10,000 each. The Khas were arrested as a result of Operation Crash, an 18-month investigation into the trafficking of rhino horns that led to arrests in a dozen states. 
    May 16, 2013 937
  • 30 Apr 2013
      Minister calls for shoot to kill policy in Botswana   Posted by Deborah Schrenk (campaign founder)   The Deputy Speaker of the Botswana Parliament, Pono Moatlhodi, has called for the immediate introduction of a shoot to kill policy to tackle poachers targeting rhino and elephants in the country. His call for a new tougher stance against the poachers comes just days after Mozambique declared that the Limpopo National Park lost its last 15 rhino to the poachers.With the rising demand for rhino horn and elephant ivory from China and Vietnam there is the real fear that the loss of rhino from the Limpopo National Park could just be the first in a line of national parks that will lose their populations. Moatlhodi said that introducing the shoot-to-kill policy is essential to protect both the rhinos and the tourist trade of the country. Protecting the wildlife that the tourists come to see is essential if the country is to widen the strength of the economy and move beyond just being a diamond producing nation.He said that there are particular concerns for the rhinos and elephants of the Kasane region in the north of Botswana which is particularly popular with tourists.While the Botswana army has been deployed to patrol areas with high incidents of poaching particularly along the borders with Zambia and Namibia,  Moatlhodi believes that giving permission to rangers, soldiers and police to shoot to kill while out on duty they will be much more effective at tackling the poachers.Saving the high profile species of elephants, rhino and gorillas will ensure that the growing tourism industry in the country has a long-term future. Wildlifenews.co.uk Posted by Kevin Heath on  April 27th, 2013 at 2: 19 pm and last updated on  April 28th, 2013 at 7: 57 amfenews .co.
    986 Posted by Chris Avena
  •   Minister calls for shoot to kill policy in Botswana   Posted by Deborah Schrenk (campaign founder)   The Deputy Speaker of the Botswana Parliament, Pono Moatlhodi, has called for the immediate introduction of a shoot to kill policy to tackle poachers targeting rhino and elephants in the country. His call for a new tougher stance against the poachers comes just days after Mozambique declared that the Limpopo National Park lost its last 15 rhino to the poachers.With the rising demand for rhino horn and elephant ivory from China and Vietnam there is the real fear that the loss of rhino from the Limpopo National Park could just be the first in a line of national parks that will lose their populations. Moatlhodi said that introducing the shoot-to-kill policy is essential to protect both the rhinos and the tourist trade of the country. Protecting the wildlife that the tourists come to see is essential if the country is to widen the strength of the economy and move beyond just being a diamond producing nation.He said that there are particular concerns for the rhinos and elephants of the Kasane region in the north of Botswana which is particularly popular with tourists.While the Botswana army has been deployed to patrol areas with high incidents of poaching particularly along the borders with Zambia and Namibia,  Moatlhodi believes that giving permission to rangers, soldiers and police to shoot to kill while out on duty they will be much more effective at tackling the poachers.Saving the high profile species of elephants, rhino and gorillas will ensure that the growing tourism industry in the country has a long-term future. Wildlifenews.co.uk Posted by Kevin Heath on  April 27th, 2013 at 2: 19 pm and last updated on  April 28th, 2013 at 7: 57 amfenews .co.
    Apr 30, 2013 986
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