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  • 21 May 2010
     Hello to all, my name is Mike.  I recently purchased my first guns.  A Marlin 336 in 30-30 winchester, and a mossberg 500 in a 20 gauge. i also have a 12 gauge, but thats for home defense purposes.  my main reason for starting this topic is because i am very interested in hunting, however i do not know anyone that hunts.  i am taking my hunter safety course the first week of june (2 weeks) i am looking for someone to take me under their wing and basically teach me how to hunt, and do it while still showing respect for the outdoors and other living creatures as well as being mindful of other hunters.  i am willing to pay for any expenses that are necessary, however im not trying to break the bank.  i am becoming a marine in the next few months and this is something i have wanted to do all my life, but it goes against everything i was ever taught growing up.  hunting is also something that i was taught never to do, however i have always wanted to.  i would like the opportunity to try it before going to parris island.  if anyone is interested please do not hesitate to contact me.  thanks for taking the time to read this...---Mike
    691 Posted by Mike Lopez
  •  Hello to all, my name is Mike.  I recently purchased my first guns.  A Marlin 336 in 30-30 winchester, and a mossberg 500 in a 20 gauge. i also have a 12 gauge, but thats for home defense purposes.  my main reason for starting this topic is because i am very interested in hunting, however i do not know anyone that hunts.  i am taking my hunter safety course the first week of june (2 weeks) i am looking for someone to take me under their wing and basically teach me how to hunt, and do it while still showing respect for the outdoors and other living creatures as well as being mindful of other hunters.  i am willing to pay for any expenses that are necessary, however im not trying to break the bank.  i am becoming a marine in the next few months and this is something i have wanted to do all my life, but it goes against everything i was ever taught growing up.  hunting is also something that i was taught never to do, however i have always wanted to.  i would like the opportunity to try it before going to parris island.  if anyone is interested please do not hesitate to contact me.  thanks for taking the time to read this...---Mike
    May 21, 2010 691
  • 22 Oct 2012
    Key to a Successful Hunt: practice shooting positions by Mia Anstine One cause for a hunter or huntress to not succeed in harvesting their animal is lack of practice. In hunters education, they teach us the four basic shooting positions, but it seems when we go to the range we sit at the bench and "sight in". It is not often that you will find a shooting [...] Read more of this post
    880 Posted by Mia Anstine
  • Key to a Successful Hunt: practice shooting positions by Mia Anstine One cause for a hunter or huntress to not succeed in harvesting their animal is lack of practice. In hunters education, they teach us the four basic shooting positions, but it seems when we go to the range we sit at the bench and "sight in". It is not often that you will find a shooting [...] Read more of this post
    Oct 22, 2012 880
  • 04 Mar 2015
    As I sit here this morning facing another "hump" day, my thoughts drift to the fall of the smells, the challenges of the upcoming hunting season and often wonder what it would be like to hunt for a living? Would I get tired of getting up before daylight, go sit in a stand no matter what the weather (unless its raining like crazy) or super windy.  Would the thrill of taking bucks of "wallhanger" class get old? Would that adrenaline rush when you see a deer go away? I personally think it wouldnt, just for the fact that no matter how many times I see deer, I still get excited, and still appriciate everthing that I have when I am out there! I think a career in the outdoor industry couldnt get any better, but I often wonder exactly how you make a living doing somehting like that? How do the superstars of the industry make it work? I know these are completly random thoughts but I have found myself considering something like this when I finally retire from Uncle Sam's Air Force. Have any of you considered anything like this, and if so, how do you go about finding a place to start?  I cant thank Chris enough for giving me a chance as a Pro Staff member, that in itself is a pretty good foundation!
    1362 Posted by Scott Stover
  • As I sit here this morning facing another "hump" day, my thoughts drift to the fall of the smells, the challenges of the upcoming hunting season and often wonder what it would be like to hunt for a living? Would I get tired of getting up before daylight, go sit in a stand no matter what the weather (unless its raining like crazy) or super windy.  Would the thrill of taking bucks of "wallhanger" class get old? Would that adrenaline rush when you see a deer go away? I personally think it wouldnt, just for the fact that no matter how many times I see deer, I still get excited, and still appriciate everthing that I have when I am out there! I think a career in the outdoor industry couldnt get any better, but I often wonder exactly how you make a living doing somehting like that? How do the superstars of the industry make it work? I know these are completly random thoughts but I have found myself considering something like this when I finally retire from Uncle Sam's Air Force. Have any of you considered anything like this, and if so, how do you go about finding a place to start?  I cant thank Chris enough for giving me a chance as a Pro Staff member, that in itself is a pretty good foundation!
    Mar 04, 2015 1362
  • 23 Apr 2010
      “Americans have the right and advantage of being armed, unlike the people of other countries, whose leaders are afraid to trust them with arms.”   ~ James Madison~
    999 Posted by Chris Avena
  •   “Americans have the right and advantage of being armed, unlike the people of other countries, whose leaders are afraid to trust them with arms.”   ~ James Madison~
    Apr 23, 2010 999
  • 29 Oct 2010
    Critical safety questions at Remington Arms Two dozen deaths, more than 100 injuries linked to Model 700 rifle By Scott Cohn Correspondent CNBC CNBC updated 10/20/2010 6:31:19 PM ET 2010-10-20T22:31:19 A 10-month investigation by CNBC has found that at least two dozen deaths and more than 100 injuries have been linked to the signature product of an iconic American company. The Remington Model 700-series rifle - with more than 5 million sold - is one of the world’s most popular firearms. Famous for its accuracy, the rifle is now the target of a series of lawsuits claiming that it is unsafe and susceptible to firing without pulling the trigger. Remington insists its rifle is safe and free of any defect, though internal documents obtained by CNBC indicate the company has wrestled with concerns over the gun’s safety for some 60 years. The documents reveal that on at least two occasions, the company considered – and then decided against – a modification of the original trigger design intended to eliminate inadvertent discharges. One of those proposed fixes would have cost Remington 5.5 cents per gun, according to the company’s own calculations. To date, more than 75 lawsuits have been filed against Remington alleging safety problems with its 700-series rifle. The company has consistently stated that the deaths and injuries involving the gun have been the result of improper modifications, poor maintenance or unsafe handling, and it has prevailed in some court cases by arguing that inexperienced users are in denial that they pulled the trigger. CNBC: Remington Under Fire One of those who have suffered devastating consequences as the result of the Remington 700-series rifle is Richard Barber, of Manhattan, Mont. In 2000, Barber said, his 9-year-old son Gus was fatally shot after a day of hunting with his family when a Remington 700 rifle inadvertently discharged. Gus’ mother, Barbara Barber, had been unloading her rifle and later said she was certain her finger was not on the trigger when the gun suddenly fired. Within days of the accident, Barber began hearing about other incidents in which Remington 700s inadvertently went off. “I went to the funeral home and looked Gus right square in the eye and I said, ‘Son, it ends here and now.'" Barber said. "I promised him I would never be bought off and I would never quit until I've effected change." The Barber family sued Remington, and as a result the company agreed in 2002 to modify certain older 700 rifles for a fee of $20. But the settlement stopped short of a full recall, and the basic design of the rifle stayed the same. CNBC found that from the very beginning, the company looked at ways to fix its bolt-action rifle, even contemplating a nationwide recall. But on more than one occasion, Remington decided against a recall. And it turns out that decision is Remington's, and Remington's alone. For most products – cars, toys, food, even BB guns - the government can order a recall. In 2010, for example, the Eagle 5 Rifle crossbow made by Master Cutlery was recalled after regulators found it could fire, without pulling the trigger, when the safety is switched off. But the Consumer Product Safety Commission cannot recall guns. Nor can the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives or the Justice Department. Guns hold a special place in American life - and American law, says Dallas attorney Jeffrey Hightower. “Remington polices itself,” he said. “The gun industry polices itself.” A federal law, passed in 1976 and upheld repeatedly in court, specifically bars the government from setting safety standards for guns, because of the Second Amendment. Rich Barber says that’s as it should be. He’s a strong supporter of gun rights and is still an avid shooter. He even sometimes shoots Remingtons. “It is our responsibility as pro-gun individuals to regulate an issue of this nature,” he said. “I am fearful that if the government got involved in this, that they would put such stringent standards on firearms, they'd be so safe, they wouldn't work.” But now, some are trying to force Remington’s hand. The company is battling two proposed class-action suits demanding a nationwide recall. Texas attorney Robert Chaffin, who is not involved in the latest suits, says that is easier said than done. He says fixing the Remington 700 has become far more expensive than years ago and now is estimated to cost $75 to $100 per gun. “So you're talking about a recall campaign that could have cost up to $300 million if it was run to its fullest,” said Chaffin. “Which was actually more than the entire net worth of the company." That cost would complicate the company’s plans to sell its stock to the public. Since 2007, Remington has been owned by the giant investment firm Cerberus, which had quietly begun buying gun companies the year before. In October 2009, Cerberus announced plans to sell stock in a new company called Freedom Group, a collection of gun makers built around Remington. Like Remington and DuPont officials, Cerberus officials declined to be interviewed for this report. The company said it couldn’t talk to us about the Remington 700 this close to the public stock offering. “I don't think anybody wants to go on national TV and lie,” said Barber. “I could say whatever I want. But those documents clearly speak for themselves and they speak volumes about what the company knew, when they knew it, what they did, and what they did not do, and what they continue to do today. It has been ten years since the death of Barber’s son. He occasionally wishes life could be back the way it was. But he knows that can never be.
    942 Posted by Chris Avena
  • Critical safety questions at Remington Arms Two dozen deaths, more than 100 injuries linked to Model 700 rifle By Scott Cohn Correspondent CNBC CNBC updated 10/20/2010 6:31:19 PM ET 2010-10-20T22:31:19 A 10-month investigation by CNBC has found that at least two dozen deaths and more than 100 injuries have been linked to the signature product of an iconic American company. The Remington Model 700-series rifle - with more than 5 million sold - is one of the world’s most popular firearms. Famous for its accuracy, the rifle is now the target of a series of lawsuits claiming that it is unsafe and susceptible to firing without pulling the trigger. Remington insists its rifle is safe and free of any defect, though internal documents obtained by CNBC indicate the company has wrestled with concerns over the gun’s safety for some 60 years. The documents reveal that on at least two occasions, the company considered – and then decided against – a modification of the original trigger design intended to eliminate inadvertent discharges. One of those proposed fixes would have cost Remington 5.5 cents per gun, according to the company’s own calculations. To date, more than 75 lawsuits have been filed against Remington alleging safety problems with its 700-series rifle. The company has consistently stated that the deaths and injuries involving the gun have been the result of improper modifications, poor maintenance or unsafe handling, and it has prevailed in some court cases by arguing that inexperienced users are in denial that they pulled the trigger. CNBC: Remington Under Fire One of those who have suffered devastating consequences as the result of the Remington 700-series rifle is Richard Barber, of Manhattan, Mont. In 2000, Barber said, his 9-year-old son Gus was fatally shot after a day of hunting with his family when a Remington 700 rifle inadvertently discharged. Gus’ mother, Barbara Barber, had been unloading her rifle and later said she was certain her finger was not on the trigger when the gun suddenly fired. Within days of the accident, Barber began hearing about other incidents in which Remington 700s inadvertently went off. “I went to the funeral home and looked Gus right square in the eye and I said, ‘Son, it ends here and now.'" Barber said. "I promised him I would never be bought off and I would never quit until I've effected change." The Barber family sued Remington, and as a result the company agreed in 2002 to modify certain older 700 rifles for a fee of $20. But the settlement stopped short of a full recall, and the basic design of the rifle stayed the same. CNBC found that from the very beginning, the company looked at ways to fix its bolt-action rifle, even contemplating a nationwide recall. But on more than one occasion, Remington decided against a recall. And it turns out that decision is Remington's, and Remington's alone. For most products – cars, toys, food, even BB guns - the government can order a recall. In 2010, for example, the Eagle 5 Rifle crossbow made by Master Cutlery was recalled after regulators found it could fire, without pulling the trigger, when the safety is switched off. But the Consumer Product Safety Commission cannot recall guns. Nor can the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives or the Justice Department. Guns hold a special place in American life - and American law, says Dallas attorney Jeffrey Hightower. “Remington polices itself,” he said. “The gun industry polices itself.” A federal law, passed in 1976 and upheld repeatedly in court, specifically bars the government from setting safety standards for guns, because of the Second Amendment. Rich Barber says that’s as it should be. He’s a strong supporter of gun rights and is still an avid shooter. He even sometimes shoots Remingtons. “It is our responsibility as pro-gun individuals to regulate an issue of this nature,” he said. “I am fearful that if the government got involved in this, that they would put such stringent standards on firearms, they'd be so safe, they wouldn't work.” But now, some are trying to force Remington’s hand. The company is battling two proposed class-action suits demanding a nationwide recall. Texas attorney Robert Chaffin, who is not involved in the latest suits, says that is easier said than done. He says fixing the Remington 700 has become far more expensive than years ago and now is estimated to cost $75 to $100 per gun. “So you're talking about a recall campaign that could have cost up to $300 million if it was run to its fullest,” said Chaffin. “Which was actually more than the entire net worth of the company." That cost would complicate the company’s plans to sell its stock to the public. Since 2007, Remington has been owned by the giant investment firm Cerberus, which had quietly begun buying gun companies the year before. In October 2009, Cerberus announced plans to sell stock in a new company called Freedom Group, a collection of gun makers built around Remington. Like Remington and DuPont officials, Cerberus officials declined to be interviewed for this report. The company said it couldn’t talk to us about the Remington 700 this close to the public stock offering. “I don't think anybody wants to go on national TV and lie,” said Barber. “I could say whatever I want. But those documents clearly speak for themselves and they speak volumes about what the company knew, when they knew it, what they did, and what they did not do, and what they continue to do today. It has been ten years since the death of Barber’s son. He occasionally wishes life could be back the way it was. But he knows that can never be.
    Oct 29, 2010 942
  • 26 May 2015
    “The Peep Eliminator” Melvin Dein contacted me and asked me if I would be willing to give a product that will enable rifle like accuracy to a bow a shot, I immediately said “absolutely”!!   He is the main man and super guy behind the Peep Eliminator a great device to achieve quicker target acquisition, shoot earlier and later and be able to shoot 1 pin out to 30-40 yards depending on your particular set up.  I received the Peep Eliminator in short order and I couldn’t wait to get it put on and see how it works.  Anything to make the shot more accurate, in low light and shoot further without using a different pin; Well, this product answers that call!  It is simple to set up, follow the directions and it will be ready to shoot in a matter of minutes! Once you get it on the bow, let the fun begin! They come in 4 different configurations:  Single Green Dot, Extender Green dot (has an adjustable slide bar) Dominate eye sight and a verifier in 2x or 4x magnification. Those of you, who carry the bow in the field or on those remote hunts, will be interested to know that they are very light weight, ranging from a mere 1.6 ounces to 8.7 ounces.  The decision is yours to make on which one you want, but if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to call Melvin, he is fantastic and will be able to help you decide in a quick minute.  One final great feature they have available is a sight light for those magical first or last 10-15 minutes of the hunting day.     I currently shoot a Mathews Z7, and a Vital Bow Gear Star Trac single pin sight. Mounting it was super easy,  the aperture lined up well with my VBG, the only thing I really had to do was adjust my sight out just a little bit to accommodate the thickness of the mounting plate on the Peep Eliminator.  The graduation marks on both axis of the sight is wonderful, easy to read and makes it easy to mark exactly where your 20 yard starting point is.  You do not have to do this, but I find it a useful reference point if I ever have to remove a sight component for whatever reason.  Shooting the new sight is definitely different, especially when you have shot for 20 plus years with just a peep sight.  I did notice that if forces you to keep the same anchor point, and will tell on you if you torque the bow one way or the other, because you will lose your front pin.  But after 5-10 shots, I did notice that my groups were tighter and that the consistency is there as well.   Overall, Shooting with the Peep Eliminator is quite the experience, for some shooters it may not be for you, but it will be a definite advantage in low light and when those sneaky bucks show up at the beginning or end of the day, this will allow you to make that shot confidently!  I personally think target shooters will benefit tremendously from it ensuring that the bow is completely level which will in turn increase your accuracy!   I would recommend this product to anyone who wants to improve accuracy, shoot earlier and later and eliminate the peep sight from your string! If you have any questions; or even need help setting it up give Melvin Deien at Peep Eliminator a call at 618-526-4427 or visit www.peepelminator.com to place an order.  Melvin is always there to answer any questions you have, and you will be hard pressed to find a better customer service representative than the founder and inventor or this amazing sight!
    1793 Posted by Scott Stover
  • “The Peep Eliminator” Melvin Dein contacted me and asked me if I would be willing to give a product that will enable rifle like accuracy to a bow a shot, I immediately said “absolutely”!!   He is the main man and super guy behind the Peep Eliminator a great device to achieve quicker target acquisition, shoot earlier and later and be able to shoot 1 pin out to 30-40 yards depending on your particular set up.  I received the Peep Eliminator in short order and I couldn’t wait to get it put on and see how it works.  Anything to make the shot more accurate, in low light and shoot further without using a different pin; Well, this product answers that call!  It is simple to set up, follow the directions and it will be ready to shoot in a matter of minutes! Once you get it on the bow, let the fun begin! They come in 4 different configurations:  Single Green Dot, Extender Green dot (has an adjustable slide bar) Dominate eye sight and a verifier in 2x or 4x magnification. Those of you, who carry the bow in the field or on those remote hunts, will be interested to know that they are very light weight, ranging from a mere 1.6 ounces to 8.7 ounces.  The decision is yours to make on which one you want, but if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to call Melvin, he is fantastic and will be able to help you decide in a quick minute.  One final great feature they have available is a sight light for those magical first or last 10-15 minutes of the hunting day.     I currently shoot a Mathews Z7, and a Vital Bow Gear Star Trac single pin sight. Mounting it was super easy,  the aperture lined up well with my VBG, the only thing I really had to do was adjust my sight out just a little bit to accommodate the thickness of the mounting plate on the Peep Eliminator.  The graduation marks on both axis of the sight is wonderful, easy to read and makes it easy to mark exactly where your 20 yard starting point is.  You do not have to do this, but I find it a useful reference point if I ever have to remove a sight component for whatever reason.  Shooting the new sight is definitely different, especially when you have shot for 20 plus years with just a peep sight.  I did notice that if forces you to keep the same anchor point, and will tell on you if you torque the bow one way or the other, because you will lose your front pin.  But after 5-10 shots, I did notice that my groups were tighter and that the consistency is there as well.   Overall, Shooting with the Peep Eliminator is quite the experience, for some shooters it may not be for you, but it will be a definite advantage in low light and when those sneaky bucks show up at the beginning or end of the day, this will allow you to make that shot confidently!  I personally think target shooters will benefit tremendously from it ensuring that the bow is completely level which will in turn increase your accuracy!   I would recommend this product to anyone who wants to improve accuracy, shoot earlier and later and eliminate the peep sight from your string! If you have any questions; or even need help setting it up give Melvin Deien at Peep Eliminator a call at 618-526-4427 or visit www.peepelminator.com to place an order.  Melvin is always there to answer any questions you have, and you will be hard pressed to find a better customer service representative than the founder and inventor or this amazing sight!
    May 26, 2015 1793
  • 20 Jun 2010
    I am concerned about this oil spill, from the point of view of waterfowl and waterbirds.  This situation has the potential to affect the waterfowl populations when the migrations starts.  Six month are not enough to clean and restore the wetlands that are being affected by the oil.  The oil not only affects the plant communities, also all other creatures that lives or depends of the marshes, like invertebrates and fishes, to name a few.  Waterfowl not only feeds on plants, they also consume invertebrates as a source of protein.  Add to that the direct effects on birds, when they all become soaked with oil, affecting their thermoregulation and poisoning because of ingestion. The oil spill has already created effects on the human schale.  Not only because of the death of the workers at the oil rig, also the livelihood of thousands of people.  I believe that this will also have an effect on waterfowl hunters for the upcoming seasons, speciffically for the Mississippi Flyway.  The Flyway Council is about to stablish the hunting regulations (i.e. bag limits) for migratoy birds for the states belonging to the four major Migration Flyways.  Each Migration Flyway has their regulations and bag limits and so and so.  If the situation keeps getting worse, I believe the Mississippi Flyway Council will adopt a more conservative hunting regulations for their flyway, meaning lowering the daily bag limit, shortening the hunting season, and/or specific species limits. Time will only tell... If you want to know more about the Gulf Coast Oil Spill effects on coastal marshes visit the Ducks Unlimited website. http://www.ducks.org/conservation/oilspill/?poe=oilspillredirect     Update June 25, 2010: Why don't they seal the well? Greed? Image of the oil spill taken by NASA (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=44375)
    614 Posted by Alexis Martinez
  • I am concerned about this oil spill, from the point of view of waterfowl and waterbirds.  This situation has the potential to affect the waterfowl populations when the migrations starts.  Six month are not enough to clean and restore the wetlands that are being affected by the oil.  The oil not only affects the plant communities, also all other creatures that lives or depends of the marshes, like invertebrates and fishes, to name a few.  Waterfowl not only feeds on plants, they also consume invertebrates as a source of protein.  Add to that the direct effects on birds, when they all become soaked with oil, affecting their thermoregulation and poisoning because of ingestion. The oil spill has already created effects on the human schale.  Not only because of the death of the workers at the oil rig, also the livelihood of thousands of people.  I believe that this will also have an effect on waterfowl hunters for the upcoming seasons, speciffically for the Mississippi Flyway.  The Flyway Council is about to stablish the hunting regulations (i.e. bag limits) for migratoy birds for the states belonging to the four major Migration Flyways.  Each Migration Flyway has their regulations and bag limits and so and so.  If the situation keeps getting worse, I believe the Mississippi Flyway Council will adopt a more conservative hunting regulations for their flyway, meaning lowering the daily bag limit, shortening the hunting season, and/or specific species limits. Time will only tell... If you want to know more about the Gulf Coast Oil Spill effects on coastal marshes visit the Ducks Unlimited website. http://www.ducks.org/conservation/oilspill/?poe=oilspillredirect     Update June 25, 2010: Why don't they seal the well? Greed? Image of the oil spill taken by NASA (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=44375)
    Jun 20, 2010 614
  • 03 Jan 2011
    Sportsmen Split on Western Wolf Issue Posted 18 Nov 20:40 by donna@southwickassociates.com FERNANDINA BEACH, Fla. — Reintroduced wolves have exceeded expectations about adapting to their western environs and many states are seeking authority to manage packs within their boundaries. As a result, the wolf issue is one of the most controversial topics throughout the Rockies where gray wolves now roam. Among those stakeholder groups attempting to be heard on the matter—state and federal legislators, animal rights activists, ranchers and sportsmen—America’s hunters have as much to gain or lose as anybody. However, when asked by HunterSurvey.com and AnglerSurvey.com what they thought about the issue, it is clear that even among our nation’s sportsmen, there remains some uncertainty as to how best to proceed. Asked if they believe western gray wolf populations are recovered and should be removed from the Endangered Species List, well over half of the respondents—57.1 percent—said “yes,” while only 6.7 percent said “no.” As many as 36.1 percent of the respondents said they “do not know.” At a rate of more than 2 to 1, however, sportsmen are concerned that growing wolf populations are having a harmful impact on elk, moose and deer populations within their range. More than 68 percent believe wolves are negatively affecting ungulate species, while 33.7 percent think the affects of more wolves are actually beneficial. Nearly the same amount of survey participants, 62.2 percent, as those who believe wolves are harming other wildlife populations say they would be more likely to vote for a candidate if they supported giving states primary management authority over wolf populations. Thirty-four percent said they weren’t sure if it would influence their vote or said the topic was too complicated to say how they would vote based on the issue. Only 3.7 percent said they would be less likely to vote for a candidate who supported state management authority. “Future management of gray wolf populations is an extremely sensitive subject, particularly in the West where it most immediately affects the people and animals that live there,” said Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates, which designs and conducts the surveys at HunterSurvey.com and AnglerSurvey.com. “The results of the survey suggest a need for more clear-cut information be made available to the public regarding the current status of the gray wolf in the region and how it is impacting other game species.” One thing respondents seem more united on is their distrust of the motivations behind animal welfare groups’ opposition to delisting the gray wolf or turning over management authority to the states. Only 16.1 percent believe these groups are acting out of genuine concern for conserving and restoring wolf populations, while many more (65 percent) believe they are acting out of an interest to limit hunting opportunities and (38.7 percent) as a means to boost membership and donations. Comments submitted by survey respondents supported these beliefs with many suggesting animal rights groups will say or do anything they can to put a stop to hunting in any form.
    939 Posted by Chris Avena
  • Sportsmen Split on Western Wolf Issue Posted 18 Nov 20:40 by donna@southwickassociates.com FERNANDINA BEACH, Fla. — Reintroduced wolves have exceeded expectations about adapting to their western environs and many states are seeking authority to manage packs within their boundaries. As a result, the wolf issue is one of the most controversial topics throughout the Rockies where gray wolves now roam. Among those stakeholder groups attempting to be heard on the matter—state and federal legislators, animal rights activists, ranchers and sportsmen—America’s hunters have as much to gain or lose as anybody. However, when asked by HunterSurvey.com and AnglerSurvey.com what they thought about the issue, it is clear that even among our nation’s sportsmen, there remains some uncertainty as to how best to proceed. Asked if they believe western gray wolf populations are recovered and should be removed from the Endangered Species List, well over half of the respondents—57.1 percent—said “yes,” while only 6.7 percent said “no.” As many as 36.1 percent of the respondents said they “do not know.” At a rate of more than 2 to 1, however, sportsmen are concerned that growing wolf populations are having a harmful impact on elk, moose and deer populations within their range. More than 68 percent believe wolves are negatively affecting ungulate species, while 33.7 percent think the affects of more wolves are actually beneficial. Nearly the same amount of survey participants, 62.2 percent, as those who believe wolves are harming other wildlife populations say they would be more likely to vote for a candidate if they supported giving states primary management authority over wolf populations. Thirty-four percent said they weren’t sure if it would influence their vote or said the topic was too complicated to say how they would vote based on the issue. Only 3.7 percent said they would be less likely to vote for a candidate who supported state management authority. “Future management of gray wolf populations is an extremely sensitive subject, particularly in the West where it most immediately affects the people and animals that live there,” said Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates, which designs and conducts the surveys at HunterSurvey.com and AnglerSurvey.com. “The results of the survey suggest a need for more clear-cut information be made available to the public regarding the current status of the gray wolf in the region and how it is impacting other game species.” One thing respondents seem more united on is their distrust of the motivations behind animal welfare groups’ opposition to delisting the gray wolf or turning over management authority to the states. Only 16.1 percent believe these groups are acting out of genuine concern for conserving and restoring wolf populations, while many more (65 percent) believe they are acting out of an interest to limit hunting opportunities and (38.7 percent) as a means to boost membership and donations. Comments submitted by survey respondents supported these beliefs with many suggesting animal rights groups will say or do anything they can to put a stop to hunting in any form.
    Jan 03, 2011 939
  • 18 Mar 2011
    Use these eight calling techniques to become a turkey assassin. Michael Waddell     It takes different calls to consistently close the coffin on longbeards. Have several calls and know how to use them.     Mastering a mouth call is critical for those last few crucial moments when you can't have any movement and your hands need to be free.     The author has found success by creating the illusion of a moving bird by using directional calling techniques.         While I dedicate a lot of time to chasing whitetails and other antlered monsters, spring turkey hunting is still one of my favorite pursuits. It's a great time to be in the woods, you don't have to freeze your butt off, and best of all, I can do most of it right near my home in Georgia. I grew up hunting ol' Booger Bottom right behind where my daddy still lives today, and I look forward to taking time off from my hectic traveling schedule every year to return there and hunt. But whether I'm hunting familiar woods I've hunted all my life or am chasing Rios or Merriam's in front of a camera in some place I've never even seen before, I use the same key skills to be successful. The most important skill I rely on is my ability to call. Calling is not only one of the things that makes turkey hunting so much fun, it's also the most important skill every turkey hunter needs to have in order to bring that big gobbler into gun range so he can ride home in the back of your truck. Here are a few tricks I've learned over the years. Maybe some of them will help you. 1 Mix It UpA lot of turkey hunters, especially beginners, learn to use one call pretty good, but never become proficient on other types. Or they may be able to use other calls, but they rely on that one they like almost exclusively. Bad mistake. Every call has its own pitch and sound and not every one is going to appeal to a particular longbeard. While one turkey may gobble his head off at your box call on Friday, that same turkey or even a different one, may ignore it on Saturday. Different calls may fire a tom up at different times. That's why it's important to learn to use several different calls and be able to run each of them as proficiently as the next. If turkeys aren't responding to your box call, switch to a mouth call or a slate. Even a tube call can work wonders in areas where gobblers have heard everything else thrown at them. If you prefer a box or a pot-and-peg type call, and are really good at that type, then buy several different ones and learn to use each of them as well as the other. Then you can keep inside your comfort zone, though I still recommend becoming versatile with different types of calls. 2 Master the Mouth CallMy favorite call to use, without a doubt, is a mouth call. To me, it's one of the most versatile. With a mouth call or diaphragm, you can make virtually every sound a turkey makes, varying rhythm, pitch and volume all with how you hold your mouth and huff air across the reeds. Best of all, it keeps your hands free so you can keep them on your shotgun when a gobbler is in close, but you need to work him just a little closer with a few light yelps or purrs. 3 Cadence is Key As varied as a hen's yelping and many other calls are, they nearly all follow a basic rhythm. In fact, I would say, when calling to a turkey at a distance at least, it is more important to have the right cadence than to even have the right sound. Listening to real turkeys in the woods or watching videos and TV shows of turkey hunts is one of the best ways to observe this cadence and learn to mimic it perfectly. Yelping, the hen's most basic call and the most important one for you to master, is delivered with evenly paced beats. Whether it is a casual yelp or one that is more excited and delivered with a little more speed, those yelps will always be spaced evenly apart. Cutting, which is really just a very excited, short burst of one-note clucks, will be more unevenly delivered, but still have a certain general rhythm to them. 4 Add Motion I bet you're scratching your head right now. "Add motion, he must be talking about decoys now," you're probably thinking. That can be helpful, too, but what I'm talking about here is adding some motion to your calling. How many guys, walk in the woods, plop down at the first gobble they make and just start calling from that same spot? If a gobbler is hopped up and ready for action, that will be enough. But when he is feeling more cautious and would rather the hen show herself, you're going to have to change positions. If a longbeard is far enough away, or even if the gobbles have gone silent on a particular morning, I will stand up and walk around, cutting and yelping and turning my head and body in different directions to make it sound like the hen is coming toward the tom and then moving away from him. I've walked 20 or 30 yards toward a gobbling tom that kept strutting back and forth out of sight to make him think I was a real hen. In these situations, try walking toward the turkey and then away while calling. Then shut up and move back to where you were closest to him and set up. The longbeard might think the hen is leaving him and finally show himself. When calling on the move like that, it is not only important that you do it when you are far enough away from a tom that he can't see you, but also that there is no chance of other hunters being around for obvious safety reasons. 5 Directional Calling Just like moving around while calling, it is important to be able to cast your sound in different directions as a gobbler approaches. With a mouth call, I cup a hand to the side of my mouth and use it to throw the sound of my calls in a particular direction. With a slate call, cup your hand beneath the sound board of the call and do basically the same thing. With a box, turn the sound chamber in a different direction, though I've found it's easier to throw a call's sound with a mouth call--one of the reason I prefer them. 6 Back It OffWhen trying to get a tom to offer up that first gobble or calling to one far off in the distance, it's perfectly fine to call as loud as you can. It's not okay to do that as that longbeard closes to within a 100 yards or less. Be sure to tone down the volume as the turkey gets closer. I've hunted with guys who had a gobbler hung-up 50 or 60 yards in front of them and then suddenly started calling as loud as if they turkey was in the next county. Loud calling will merely blow the turkey out, spooking him and sending him the other direction.  7 Clucks and PurrsThe yelp is the turkey's primary call, while cutting really works to get a longbeard fired up, but sometimes you need to go easy. That's where a single-note cluck and soft purrs can really come into play, particularly when working birds in close. Purrs are made when turkeys are content and can make a nervous tom relax as he works within range. 8 Keep It CleanWhen using friction calls such as a pot-and-peg or a box call, be careful not to touch the calling surfaces with your fingers. You also want to keep the surfaces free of dirt and free of moisture (unless the call is made to run wet.) Over time, oils in your skin can clog the pores in wood and slate, while it can make a striker slip and squeak on glass or metal. Likewise, don't touch the end of your strikers or stick them down in the dirt. Proper care will keep friction calls working a lifetime--at least yours.
    1135 Posted by Chris Avena
  • Use these eight calling techniques to become a turkey assassin. Michael Waddell     It takes different calls to consistently close the coffin on longbeards. Have several calls and know how to use them.     Mastering a mouth call is critical for those last few crucial moments when you can't have any movement and your hands need to be free.     The author has found success by creating the illusion of a moving bird by using directional calling techniques.         While I dedicate a lot of time to chasing whitetails and other antlered monsters, spring turkey hunting is still one of my favorite pursuits. It's a great time to be in the woods, you don't have to freeze your butt off, and best of all, I can do most of it right near my home in Georgia. I grew up hunting ol' Booger Bottom right behind where my daddy still lives today, and I look forward to taking time off from my hectic traveling schedule every year to return there and hunt. But whether I'm hunting familiar woods I've hunted all my life or am chasing Rios or Merriam's in front of a camera in some place I've never even seen before, I use the same key skills to be successful. The most important skill I rely on is my ability to call. Calling is not only one of the things that makes turkey hunting so much fun, it's also the most important skill every turkey hunter needs to have in order to bring that big gobbler into gun range so he can ride home in the back of your truck. Here are a few tricks I've learned over the years. Maybe some of them will help you. 1 Mix It UpA lot of turkey hunters, especially beginners, learn to use one call pretty good, but never become proficient on other types. Or they may be able to use other calls, but they rely on that one they like almost exclusively. Bad mistake. Every call has its own pitch and sound and not every one is going to appeal to a particular longbeard. While one turkey may gobble his head off at your box call on Friday, that same turkey or even a different one, may ignore it on Saturday. Different calls may fire a tom up at different times. That's why it's important to learn to use several different calls and be able to run each of them as proficiently as the next. If turkeys aren't responding to your box call, switch to a mouth call or a slate. Even a tube call can work wonders in areas where gobblers have heard everything else thrown at them. If you prefer a box or a pot-and-peg type call, and are really good at that type, then buy several different ones and learn to use each of them as well as the other. Then you can keep inside your comfort zone, though I still recommend becoming versatile with different types of calls. 2 Master the Mouth CallMy favorite call to use, without a doubt, is a mouth call. To me, it's one of the most versatile. With a mouth call or diaphragm, you can make virtually every sound a turkey makes, varying rhythm, pitch and volume all with how you hold your mouth and huff air across the reeds. Best of all, it keeps your hands free so you can keep them on your shotgun when a gobbler is in close, but you need to work him just a little closer with a few light yelps or purrs. 3 Cadence is Key As varied as a hen's yelping and many other calls are, they nearly all follow a basic rhythm. In fact, I would say, when calling to a turkey at a distance at least, it is more important to have the right cadence than to even have the right sound. Listening to real turkeys in the woods or watching videos and TV shows of turkey hunts is one of the best ways to observe this cadence and learn to mimic it perfectly. Yelping, the hen's most basic call and the most important one for you to master, is delivered with evenly paced beats. Whether it is a casual yelp or one that is more excited and delivered with a little more speed, those yelps will always be spaced evenly apart. Cutting, which is really just a very excited, short burst of one-note clucks, will be more unevenly delivered, but still have a certain general rhythm to them. 4 Add Motion I bet you're scratching your head right now. "Add motion, he must be talking about decoys now," you're probably thinking. That can be helpful, too, but what I'm talking about here is adding some motion to your calling. How many guys, walk in the woods, plop down at the first gobble they make and just start calling from that same spot? If a gobbler is hopped up and ready for action, that will be enough. But when he is feeling more cautious and would rather the hen show herself, you're going to have to change positions. If a longbeard is far enough away, or even if the gobbles have gone silent on a particular morning, I will stand up and walk around, cutting and yelping and turning my head and body in different directions to make it sound like the hen is coming toward the tom and then moving away from him. I've walked 20 or 30 yards toward a gobbling tom that kept strutting back and forth out of sight to make him think I was a real hen. In these situations, try walking toward the turkey and then away while calling. Then shut up and move back to where you were closest to him and set up. The longbeard might think the hen is leaving him and finally show himself. When calling on the move like that, it is not only important that you do it when you are far enough away from a tom that he can't see you, but also that there is no chance of other hunters being around for obvious safety reasons. 5 Directional Calling Just like moving around while calling, it is important to be able to cast your sound in different directions as a gobbler approaches. With a mouth call, I cup a hand to the side of my mouth and use it to throw the sound of my calls in a particular direction. With a slate call, cup your hand beneath the sound board of the call and do basically the same thing. With a box, turn the sound chamber in a different direction, though I've found it's easier to throw a call's sound with a mouth call--one of the reason I prefer them. 6 Back It OffWhen trying to get a tom to offer up that first gobble or calling to one far off in the distance, it's perfectly fine to call as loud as you can. It's not okay to do that as that longbeard closes to within a 100 yards or less. Be sure to tone down the volume as the turkey gets closer. I've hunted with guys who had a gobbler hung-up 50 or 60 yards in front of them and then suddenly started calling as loud as if they turkey was in the next county. Loud calling will merely blow the turkey out, spooking him and sending him the other direction.  7 Clucks and PurrsThe yelp is the turkey's primary call, while cutting really works to get a longbeard fired up, but sometimes you need to go easy. That's where a single-note cluck and soft purrs can really come into play, particularly when working birds in close. Purrs are made when turkeys are content and can make a nervous tom relax as he works within range. 8 Keep It CleanWhen using friction calls such as a pot-and-peg or a box call, be careful not to touch the calling surfaces with your fingers. You also want to keep the surfaces free of dirt and free of moisture (unless the call is made to run wet.) Over time, oils in your skin can clog the pores in wood and slate, while it can make a striker slip and squeak on glass or metal. Likewise, don't touch the end of your strikers or stick them down in the dirt. Proper care will keep friction calls working a lifetime--at least yours.
    Mar 18, 2011 1135
  • 26 Jan 2012
    A Day Off by Mia Anstine I was supposed to sleep in this morning... Yeah right. I tend to rise around 4am, and sleeping in is generally around 6:30am. Today was my day off and I did NOT "sleep in". I woke up and tended to some of my designated chores. Hank was nice enough to drive the Little Gal to [...] Read more of this post Mia Anstine | January 26, 2012 at 3:00 pm | Tags: Mia Anstine | Categories: hunting | URL: http://wp.me/pRUwK-qu
    683 Posted by Mia Anstine
  • A Day Off by Mia Anstine I was supposed to sleep in this morning... Yeah right. I tend to rise around 4am, and sleeping in is generally around 6:30am. Today was my day off and I did NOT "sleep in". I woke up and tended to some of my designated chores. Hank was nice enough to drive the Little Gal to [...] Read more of this post Mia Anstine | January 26, 2012 at 3:00 pm | Tags: Mia Anstine | Categories: hunting | URL: http://wp.me/pRUwK-qu
    Jan 26, 2012 683
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